Plastic Side Chair by Marius Roosendaal

Plastic Side Chair by Marius Roosendaal

(Source: msced.mariusroosendaal.com)

Josef Muller-Brockmann & The International Typographic Style by Quentin Delobel.

Week 13- Feedback from Final Presentations

Refined Concept Statement (based on grant’s suggestions)

Highway (design principles)

Design Issue- Exploring the process involved in the visualisation of data and the use of data circles as a method of this design field. 

Design Context- Data visualisation

Project Form- A large poster which consists of a series of smaller posters that each present a data circle visualisation of data related to asylum seekers arriving in Australia.

Background Information- This project aims to visualise the Asylum seeker issue in Australia, educating and engaging a wide community audience about this topic. Due to the nature of the social issue and medium involved, a more specific target audience of 16-35 years olds, with limited knowledge in data visualisation, will be intended.

Motor Car (design artifact)

Project form- A large poster which consists of a series of smaller posters that each present a data circle visualisation of data related to asylum seekers arriving in Australia. This project aims to visualise the Asylum seeker issue in Australia, educating and engaging a wide community audience about this topic. Due to the nature of the social issue and medium involved, a more specific target audience of 16-35 years olds, with limited knowledge in data visualisation, will be intended.

Week 12- Another setback….

In this week’s class, I got around to visualising all of my data circles based on my drawn diagrams. Now I just needed to apply colour to the design, organise the layout and select a typeface as well as other design considerations. Jo provided suggestions to help with these decisions such as for the display of the data circle keys. She also suggested that I use the typefaces Din or Rotis, swedish typefaces, which she believed would compliment my design. I felt positive in starting the design and having a more complete design artefact for the presentation next week.

However, I thought it would be best to show my data circles to my sister, just to check over and make sure that they were accurate. While my data and the way I displayed my data circles was correct/mathematically accurate, she felt that my method was not the best way to visualise them. I used the percentages of my data to be represented in percentages of the circle’s diameter. While this method is accurate in comparing the widths of the circles, I found out when I showed my data circles to other people, that most people associate comparisons between circles as based on size of area, like what my sister suggested. So I spent all this week, working out the new maths involved for applying my data with circle area and then changing my data circles to accommodate this. I was also lucky this week to find a friend who helped me work out the ratio differences between the data circles, as now that I am displaying them for print, rather than screen, due to the immense difference between the number of refugees, compared with Asylum Seekers, displaying them literally in proportion would mean that my smaller circles would only be less than a cm in size as compared with a 30cm diameter for the largest circle! Unfortunately because of this little setback, I haven’t had much time to work on a more defined design artefact for next week’s presentation. But the maths is now finally correct!

In Wednesday’s class, I also got feedback from another tutor, Grant about changing my project’s concept statement to reflect the process that I have undertaken, rather than simply focussing on my design artefact. Its a different thought that I am considering. I am a little unsure but either way I will have to really think about my project statement for the monday presentation next week and see what he and Jo think about my project as a whole.

More inspiration from the current ‘Monographics’ issue of IDN magazine.

More inspiration from the current ‘Monographics’ issue of IDN magazine.

Week 11- Implementing, Implementing & more Implementing…

Jo’s lecture this week was really informative about the requirements for our major project assessment and it’s exhibition in the graduation show. The considerations involved in how to display our work helped me to finally decide what format I want my major project to be. That is, I am now more certain that I am going to design each data circle set as it’s own individual image/poster and then when they are all together, they from one whole larger image/poster. I am thinking about either A3 sizes for the individual posters (6 data circles in total) and together they would form a combined size of a little smaller than A0.

To get started in designing and implementing my major project, I drew up a more detailed sketches of each data circle to be designed in the posters, as shown in the earlier post. Before, I sketched these up, I was torn between whether to design different data circles for each data set (as with the Guardian- Days of the week data visualisation examples) or whether to design them all with the same data circle type (as with the Illinois Visualising Music: Word Usage examples)? I decided that I don’t need to design different data circles for different data sets. I could, but in order to effectively show the interconnections and to allow for comparisons between my different data sets together, I thought it would be best to show them in the same style of data circles. Plus, as with the Illinois Visualising Music: Word Usage examples, the different data and colours of the individual data sets will make their circle visualisations vary from each other, to allow for effective comparisons. 

When drawing up the detailed sketches of the data sets, all mathematically correct, I also encountered a 2nd issue about whether to do some of the data circles proportionally, that is each circle within a dataset is proportionally in size based on some of the data or another option was to design every circle within a data set as equal in size. In order to follow with this second option, I would have to change how some of the data sets would be shown. This issue is demonstrated with the 2 versions of the sketch, Data Circle 5- IMA vs NON-IMA. They look similar but they display some important differences. I got some opinions off my friends. They all agreed that the 1st option of displaying the circles proportionally to the data was the most effective in representing the data. With this issue resolved, I have now started to transfer these sketches into a final design document in Ilustrator. I hope to have at least two of the data circles absolutely complete before Week 13’s final presentation and then the rest I hope to finish before the Week 15 submission. 

My sketches of my final data circles for design, all mathematically accurate/in proportion (except data circle six- top 5 origins, I didn’t have enough room on an a4 page to make it in proportion).

International Paper Sizes

International Paper Sizes